Caribbean Travelweb


Guide To Cayman Islands




Description

The Cayman Islands are situated in the Caribbean, 290km (180 miles) northwest of Jamaica, and comprise Grand Cayman, Little Cayman and Cayman Brac. Cayman's beaches are renowned to be among the best in the world, in particular Seven Mile Beach on Grand Cayman. Although in relative proximity, each of the islands is unique in its developed infrastructure as well as the type of topography found both on land and underwater.

Miles of powdery white beaches above clear blue water and one of the richest marine environments make Grand Cayman one of the Caribbean's finest vacation destinations (and a world class scuba diving destination). As a British Crown Colony, Grand Cayman enjoys all of the benefits of sophisticated government, touting one of the strongest economies in the Caribbean (with over 600 banks) while still allowing visitors to enjoy duty free shopping in Georgetown for jewelry, art, local crafts, and unique souvenirs like treasure coins from a sunken Spanish galleon circa the Pirates of the Caribbean era.

Grand Cayman is the largest of the Cayman Islands and contains George Town, the capital. Yet at just 22 miles long and with only 40,000 full time inhabitants, it is easy to get acquainted with this quaint little island.

The east end of the island is still quite undeveloped, while the west side of the island, which has George Town and the airport, Owen Roberts International Airport, is very well developed. Fast food restaurants and resorts are common on the west side of the island.

The most well known beach on the island is the Seven Mile Beach. Most tourists stay in Grand Cayman as the sand on the island is very soft, appealing to travelers who are chasing after relaxation..

Cayman Brac is the middle sister of the three Cayman Islands. It is a coral island surrounded by reef with a population of about 1200 residents. It has changed very little since it was discovered in 1503 by Christopher Columbus. Despite its history of pirate adventure and hidden treasure, it remains a peaceful quiet hideaway not only for divers and snorkelers, but also for sports fishermen, bird watchers, rock climbers, and those who just want to relax.

The Brac is far removed from the hurried pace associated with the world at large, where the ebb and flow of time is measured not by the clock, but by what crops are ready for harvest, what birds are migrating through, or when the orchids are blooming. It retains the distinct charm of the Caribbean of many years ago. Gingerbread details on pastel colored houses are the creations of local carpenters trained as woodcraft artists for shipbuilding. The inhabitants are genuinely welcoming and friendly with a propensity for laughter. There is literally no traffic (not one traffic light), the beaches are uncrowded, the scuba diving spectacular and scenery abounds like no other you have seen. Dining is offered in a variety of unique and unusual circumstances, and the few shops that display local artistic skill and crafts are usually found in a room within someone's home. Besides an obvious opportunity for rest and relaxation in this tropical paradise however, you might develop a distinct sense that an adventure may be hidden and waiting for your discovery.

Little Cayman, 11 miles long and 1 mile wide, is the smallest of the three Cayman Islands in the British West Indies, and is located about 90 miles northeast of Grand Cayman and 5 miles west of Cayman Brac. The Cayman Islands are 170 miles northeast of Jamaica and 480 miles south of Miami.

The lapping waters and white sand beaches lie as peaceful and calm as the people. Journeying into Little Cayman is unique unto itself. As you approach the grass runway the magic unfolds, bringing you back in time and another world. A world where you can walk down sandy Blossom Lane, watch the moon rise over Owens Island and cast leisurely for Bonefish and Tarpon. This modest island is considered to be in the top five scuba diving destinations worldwide. The second deepest body of water in the world surrounds it.

There are about 200 residents, 40 vehicles, one stop sign, one shopping center and one bank. If quiet relaxation, combined with world class diving is what you’re looking for, Little Cayman welcomes you!

Getting There

Air Travel

There are more than 55 weekly flights into the Cayman Islands including 28 flights each week between Miami and Grand Cayman with connections to Cayman Brac and Little Cayman.

Airlines Serving the Cayman Islands

American Airlines

Cayman Airways

Delta Airlines

Air Canada

British Airways.

Southwest

A number of charter flights also operate from various US cities and Canada year-round.

Helpful Visitor Information

Language
English is spoken on all three islands. The dialect of Caymanians is somewhat of a mixture of American southern drawl, English slur with a Scottish lilt to punctuate.

Money

The local currency, the Cayman Islands dollar, is equivalent to US $1.25. American currency is generally accepted as are major credit cards. Banking hours are 9 am to 2:30 pm Monday through Thursday, and 9 am to 1 pm, and 2 pm to 4:30 pm on Friday. The departure tax when leaving Cayman is US $12.50.

Taxis
Taxis are available at Owen Roberts International Airport on Grand Cayman and offer a fixed rate per vehicle or per person to all points on Grand Cayman. This information is available from the taxi dispatcher at the curb. Hotel vans cannot provide courtesy arrival pickup at the airport. Taxis are also readily available from all resorts .

Bus Service
The bus terminal is located adjacent the Public Library on Edward St. in downtown George Town and serves as the dispatch point for buses to all districts. Daily service starts at 6 a.m. from the depot and the schedule is as follows from George Town to:

West Bay - every 15 minutes, 6 a.m. - 11 p.m., Sunday - Thursday; 6 a.m. - midnight, Fri. & Sat. Fare is CI$1.50 each way.

Bodden Town - Every 30 minutes, 6 a.m. - 11 p.m., Sunday- Thurs.; 6 a.m. - midnight, Fri. & Sat. Fare is CI$1.50 each way.

East End and North Side - Every hour, 6 a.m. - 9 p.m., Sunday - Thurs. and Saturday. On Friday, buses will operate until after Midnight. Fare: CI$2 each way.

Rental Cars
Driving in the Caymans is on the left side of the road. The law also requires mandatory wearing of seat belts. In order to rent a car, you must obtain a temporary drivers license from the police station or car rental agency, easily granted upon presenting a valid drivers licence from their home state, county. The fee is US$7.50. You must be 21 to rent a car in the Cayman Islands, and some rental agencies' insurance will not cover renters under 25. Check with your rental company in advance to determine.

Many major rental car companies are located in Cayman, as well as a number of local agencies. A variety of models of rental cars are available, most with right hand drive. Rentals are also available on Cayman Brac and Little Cayman, mostly jeeps and 4 wheel drives.

Sopeds/Scooters
Mopeds and scooters are also available on Grand Cayman and Cayman Brac. Riders are required by law to wear a helmet at all times. Remember to stay on the left. Average daily rate is US$25 which includes helmet and permit.

Shopping
Cayman is a duty-free destination which means many exciting opportunities for you to save on such things as watches, china and crystal, perfumes and fine jewelry on Grand Cayman and at a few stores on Cayman Brac. Prices on perfume, watches and select luxury items may be as much as 30% less expensive here.

In addition to traditional duty free selections, varied and interesting shopping--from chic European fashions to outstanding local art--delights visitors in speciality stores, hotel boutiques and shopping plazas.

You'll find a small variety of Caribbean crafts and products including crochet work, paintings and sketches of Caribbean scenes, thatch work, pepper sauces, Caymanite (the islands' own semiprecious stone), jewelry, sculpture and wood carvings. Most of the items are made in Jamaica, not in the Caymans. Antiques and treasure-coin jewelry attract an enthusiastic clientele, though these items can be expensive. You may see items made from black coral and sea-turtle products, but we urge you not to buy them: Both the coral and the turtles are endangered, and each sale encourages more of these rare species to be harvested (the gathering of black coral is done in the waters of other countries -- it's prohibited in the Caymans). Turtle products are illegal in most countries.

Tipping

Many of the hotels and restaurants automatically add a 10% to 15% gratuity on to the bill, others do not. Be sure to examine your bill.

Drinking Age

The legal age for alcohol consumption is a minimum of 18 years old. It is a serious offence to drink and drive. The legal limit is under .01.

Dress
Most restaurants require shoes and shirts, and shorts instead of long pants are generally acceptable. Some of the upscale restaurants may require slacks for evening dinner. Please do not wear bathing suits or "skimpy" beach wear beyond the beach or cruise ship. Note that there are no nude beaches in the Cayman Islands and that public nudity and topless bathing are prohibited by law.

Electricity
The Cayman Islands use the same electrical standards as the USA - 110 volts, 60 Hz.

Water
Public water in the Cayman Islands is safe. All hotels and condos, and most restaurants and private homes are connected to the city water supply. The water is pumped from the sea and then purified by reverse osmosis.

Medical Facilities
Grand Cayman and Cayman Brac have a full complement of modern medical facilities, including government run hospitals. Private medical centres are in Grand Cayman with a 911 emergency service. Medivac services to the U.S.A. can be arranged when necessary. Vaccinations are not mandatory.

Time Zone
The Cayman Islands are on Eastern Standard Time all year long.

Activities and Attractions

Scuba Diving
Divers have been making the trek to the Cayman Islands for many years. The water is warm and visibility is super. The Caymans offer divers of all skill levels something to remember.

Reefs, colorful and vibrant, with marine life in such an abundance, it will bring out the best in every photographer. You want walls? From all three islands, the wall diving has become famous. How about wrecks? There are a number of wreck dives, one of the most popular being the Captain Kieth Tibbetts, an ex Russian warship, sunk in 1996 and now home to an abundance of reef fish.

Snorkelling
The undersea world of Cayman may be equaled but not surpassed and snorkelling is a good alternative to scuba if for some reason you are not able to dive. There are literally hundreds of sites where the water is shallow enough to snorkel and where you can experience the amazing diversity of our marine world. All of the reputable water sports operators will offer snorkel trips and will take you where the fish are plentiful. Snorkelling from the beach is an alternative to a boat snorkel trip and popular spots include the West Bay Cemetery Reef, Smith's Cove and Eden Rock.

Parasailing
An experience that will not be forgotten. You'll rise to about 200 feet, towed aloft by a powerful speedboat, your parachute gently lifting you skyward. Marvel at the view of the Seven Mile Beach and George Town harbour, and, as you glide through the air, the cruise ships below seemed dwarfed. Enjoy the ride by yourself or with a companion.

Jet skiing
The noise may be an annoyance to some, but you'll enjoy the exhilaration of zipping along at over 30 mph. A quick lesson in operating the watercraft, and some safety tips, and you'll be on your way. Always be aware of the divers down flags and respect swimmers in the area.

Sailing
Glide quietly along the water and enjoy the warm Cayman breezes as you steer your rented sailboat into the wind. Anchor in a shallow spot and snorkel or swim to cool off. Rather let someone else do the sailing? Then take a sailboat cruise to Stingray City or an evening dinner cruise into the sunset.

Windsurfing
We don't have the big waves of Hawaii but it's just as much fun. The beginner will get lessons in staying upright and steering the sailboard, then it's fun in the sun. The water will lap at your feet as you glide quietly along the gentle waves, pushed by the warm Cayman sea breezes. For the more experienced, the strong winds of the east coast of the island will offer a challenge.

Other water sports include kayaking, water skiing, knee boarding and banana boat rides. Most of the glossy tourist magazines that you'll find once you arrive will have more details about all of the above water sports.

In addition to water sports you'll find other above and below water activities including:

Glass bottom boat rides
Semi-submersible boat rides
Submarine dives to 100, 800 or 1,000 feet
Sailboat dinner cruises
Don't forget that the sun down here in the Caribbean will burn you badly if you over expose yourself. If you're not used to the sun, wear a strong sunscreen such as SPF 30 or higher. Many a vacationer has spoiled their trip with too much sun, too quickly. In addition, please remember that the damage caused by over exposure to the sun lasts long after the tan has faded.


Shopping

Cayman is a duty-free destination which means many exciting opportunities for you to save on such things as watches, china and crystal, perfumes and fine jewelry on Grand Cayman and at a few stores on Cayman Brac. Prices on perfume, watches and select luxury items may be as much as 30% less expensive here.

In addition to traditional duty free selections, varied and interesting shopping--from chic European fashions to outstanding local art--delights visitors in speciality stores, hotel boutiques and shopping plazas.

You'll find a small variety of Caribbean crafts and products including crochet work, paintings and sketches of Caribbean scenes, thatch work, pepper sauces, Caymanite (the islands' own semiprecious stone), jewelry, sculpture and wood carvings. Most of the items are made in Jamaica, not in the Caymans. Antiques and treasure-coin jewelry attract an enthusiastic clientele, though these items can be expensive. You may see items made from black coral and sea-turtle products, but we urge you not to buy them: Both the coral and the turtles are endangered, and each sale encourages more of these rare species to be harvested (the gathering of black coral is done in the waters of other countries -- it's prohibited in the Caymans). Turtle products are illegal in most countries.


Restaurants

At the more than 200 restaurants you will find every type of setting and cuisine imaginable. Fish and seafood menus are obviously in abundance because of the locale. The West Indian heritage of the Caymans provides the local flavor whether you are dining casual, elegant or at one of the many jerk stands around the islands.

The American restaurant chains are noticeable all up and down Seven Mile Beach and George Town. Pizza, subs, chicken and hamburgers are familiar to North American visitors. Ethnic foods are becoming more and more popular with Austrian, Chinese, Japanese, Thai, Italian, English and French restaurants to name but a few.


Nightlife

The Cayman Islands offers an enjoyable variety of nightlife and entertainment. Once you arrive, consult our local publications for the latest listings. Local publications with nightlife information include Friday's edition of the local newspaper, the Caymanian Compass; Key To Cayman; What's Hot; and What to Do. The legal age for alcohol consumption is a minimum of 18 years old. It is a serious offence to drink and drive. The legal limit is under .01.


Golf

Do not forget to bring your clubs when you come to the Cayman Islands for the golf courses here will delight, amaze and challenge every player.

Experience spectacular ocean views in a luxurious tropical oasis. These stunning courses offer a magnificent blend of lush greens and fairways that will test golfers of every caliber.

Take advantage of the many exciting major and local tournaments. And, for a more light-hearted time, visit the Mini-Golf miniature golf course. Have a laugh and fun time on a tropical sunny afternoon!


Fishing

The Cayman Islands are well known by fisherman the world over as a top destination for all types of sport fishing. From deep-water trolling for Blue Marlin to casting for Bonefish in the knee-deep waters of a lagoon, you'll find the action you're looking for.

The best fishing is usually in the months of May, June, and July, with Blue Marlin, Yellow fin Tuna, Dolphin, and Bonefish being most plentiful then. Wahoo are most plentiful in the months of December to March.

You will not require any special licence to fish in the Cayman Islands, and you may bring your own gear with you. There are certain restrictions on where you may fish, and these areas are clearly marked on information booklets, which are available locally. Once on the island you may contact the Department of Tourism for one of these booklets.

While most of the locals may tend to head out to their favourite 'fishing hole' in a small boat with an outboard motor, you may prefer the comfort and luxury of a large sport fishing cruiser. There are many sport-fishing operators on the island and they usually take care of all your needs including the tackle and bait. Most sport-fishing operators can also arrange trips to Stingray City as well as dive trips and custom charters.

You will appreciate the experience and knowledge of the local boat captains and crewmembers that will assist you while you fish for the big one. Many an angler has left these islands with big smiles and even bigger stories about the one that didn't get away.


Horseback Riding

Horseback riding is one of the most popular activities to enjoy during your stay in the Cayman Islands. If you love the outdoors, nature & horses then this one's for you! You can experience scenic rides along the beach, through woodland trails, or a romantic moonlight ride.

Above Water Attractions

Hell, Grand Cayman
Jagged black rock formations in Grand Cayman's northwest fabled to resemble the actual "hell."

Cayman Turtle Farm, George Town, Grand Cayman
Government-run operation raises green turtles to increase their population in the wild.

Rum Point, Grand Cayman
Secluded beach on northern Grand Cayman.

Pedro St. James "Castle", Grand Cayman
Dating from 1780, the oldest building in the Caymans has been everything from jail to courthouse to parliament before recent refurbishments turned it into a museum.

Mastic Trail, Grand Cayman
Guided tours are offered on this old nature trail that takes visitors through several of the island's various ecosystems.

Queen Elizabeth II Botanic Park, Grand Cayman
Home to orchids (in bloom late May through June) and elusive iguanas as well as parrots and other birds.

Bodden Town Pirates' Caves, Grand Cayman
Rumor has it that pirates used to stash their booty in these caves, which are now chock-full of parrots, crossbones and scarecrows in pirate hats.

Blow Holes, Grand Cayman
The water pressure in underwater caverns causes a large geyser to spray high out of the water.

Bodden Town, Grand Cayman
East of George Town, this is a pirate-lover's dream.

Old Homestead, Grand Cayman
Formerly known as the West Bay Pink House, this is probably the most photographed home in Grand Cayman. The pink-and-white Caymanian cottage was built in 1912 of wattle and daub around an ironwood frame. Cheery Mac Bothwell, who grew up in the house, takes you on tours that present a nostalgic and touching look at life in Grand Cayman before the tourism and banking booms. COST: $5. Mon.-Sat. 8-5.

Cayman Brac Museum, Cayman Brac
Tiny museum featuring shipbuilding tools and kitchen utensils.

Parrot Preserve, Cayman Brac
Parrot Preserve - A must see is the 180 acre preserve which was established to protect the endemic, endangered Cayman Brac Parrot. There is a two mile nature trail for hiking through the Preserve--a good place to see the beautiful local flora and fauna as well.

Doc Polson Wreck, Grand Cayman
Shipwreck favored by divers.

Cayman Islands National Museum, George Town, Grand Cayman
One of the best museums in the Caribbean, it features changing exhibits on the islands' human and natural history.

Owen Island, Cayman Islands
Little area perfect for picnic lunching.

Tarpon Lake, Little Cayman
As it's name suggests, this beautiful lake is teeming with tarpon.


Britannia Golf Course, George Town, Grand Cayman
Located at the Hyatt Regency Grand Cayman, this unusual course features the 'short' ball developed by golf great Jack Nicklaus.

Booby Pond Nature Reserve, Little Cayman
Home to one of the hemisphere's largest breeding populations of red-footed boobies and a large colony of swooping frigate birds.

Guard House, Grand Cayman
Local legend states that the site was one of the former capitals three lines of defense against invading pirate marauders.

Queen Victoria Monument, Grand Cayman
Erected between 1907 and 1912, it's the regular meeting site for the men of the district to discuss politics.

Slave Wall / Drummond's Wall, Grand Cayman
A slave of Spanish origin named Drummond supervised a seven foot section which led to the wall often being called "Drummonds Wall."

Gun Square, Grand Cayman
One of Bodden Town's two defense points in the 18th century.

Meagre Bay Pond, Grand Cayman
Located on the southern coast of Grand Cayman, the pond features grebes, plovers, shovelers and snowy egrets.

East End, Grand Cayman
Offers luxuriant vegetation and over 200 species of birds.

Fort George, George Town, Grand Cayman
The remains of the late 18th century fortress offering a historical walking tour.

Cayman Maritime Treasure Museum, George Town, Grand Cayman
The museum features dioramas on the islands' seafaring days and a robotic Blackbeard that spins yarns about the Caymans' swashbuckling past.

Pollards Bay, Cayman Brac
This bay is the easternmost point on Cayman Brac and is known for the great scenery provided by the limestone bluff that looms overhead.

Henderson House, Grand Cayman
This interesting house was built in the 1930s by Carroll Henderson, who built the structure by setting thousands of seashells in concrete.

Harbour Drive, Grand Cayman
This road heads eastward out of George Town and is a perfect drive for those who want to view the local culture of the island.

Old May Bay, Grand Cayman
One of the more affluent neighborhoods on the north side of Grand Cayman, the beaches here are less crowded.

F.J. Harquai Theatre, Grand Cayman
This theater features frequent Caribbean cultural performances.

Governor Michael Gore Bird Sanctuary, Grand Cayman
An excellent place to view some of the 200 bird species indigenous to the Caymans.

The Links at Safehaven, Seven Mile Beach, Grand Cayman
New championship golf course.

Sunrise Family Golf Centre, Seven Mile Beach, Grand Cayman
Touristy golf course and entertainment center in Grand Cayman.

Clock Tower, George Town, Grand Cayman
This monument to King George V sits in downtown George Town.

National Trust Visitors Centre, Little Cayman
Offers information on native birds and a viewing platform with binoculars.

Blossom Village Museum, Little Cayman
Small museum dedicated to the history of Little Cayman.

Little Cayman Baptist Church, Little Cayman
Rebuilt after the 1932 hurricane, the island's only church is also its oldest standing building.

Salt Rocks Nature Trail, Little Cayman
Trail where phosphate-mining operations were conducted in the last century.

National Trust Parrot Reserve, Cayman Brac
Though most parrots can be seen in town, this is nesting ground for the islands' emerald green native species.

Brac Museum, Spot Bay, Cayman Brac


Underwater Attractions

Stingray City, Grand Cayman
Located at the North Sound sandbar, stingrays gather here to be fed. Half-day trips are offered.

Bloody Bay Wall, Little Cayman
Famous dive spot in Little Cayman.

Cemetery Reef, Grand Cayman

The Sandbar, Grand Cayman
This shallow, sandy area is one of two spots on Grand Cayman that are ideal for snorkeling among the stingrays.

Oro Verde Wreck, Grand Cayman
Shipwreck favored by divers.

Devil's Grotto, Grand Cayman
Virtual playground of mazes and grottoes.

Jackson Point, Little Cayman
Famous dive spot in Little Cayman.

McCurley's Drop-off, Grand Cayman
Red and orange vase sponges grow in large clusters from Black Coral trees.

Nancy's Cup of Tea, Little Cayman
One of several popular sites off Little Cayman.

Wilderness Wall, Cayman Brac
Dive spot featuring a huge, 40-foot-wide coral pinnacle with a 55-foot precipice.

Tarpon Alley, Grand Cayman
One of the many places off Grand Cayman to sight groupers, schooling Permit, Horse-eye Jacks, African Pompano and, occasionally, reef sharks or Hammerheads.

Dragon's Hole, Grand Cayman
Popular dive spot.

Western Wall, Seven Mile Beach, Grand Cayman
Full of legendary dive sites, this is a great place for beginners or seasoned pros.

North Wall, Grand Cayman
Diving area that hosts sting and eagle rays, turtles and masses of coral.

Three Sisters, Grand Cayman
Features three, magnificent 60-foot high monoliths perched along the drop-offs outer edge.

Cayman Wall, Grand Cayman
The underwater landscape is densely encrusted with forests of corals, giant sponges and other marine life.

Snapper Hole, Grand Cayman
More caves and caverns than any other site around the island.

West Bay, Grand Cayman
Offers beautiful diving sites.

Round Rock, Grand Cayman
Dive site featuring deep canyons, formations of overlapping plate coral and narrow passageways leading down the wall.

Trinity Caves, Grand Cayman
Dive site featuring deep canyons, formations of overlapping plate coral and narrow passageways leading down the wall.

Eagle Ray Pass, Grand Cayman
One of the many places off Grand Cayman to sight groupers, schooling Permit, Horse-eye Jacks, African Pompano and, occasionally, reef sharks or Hammerheads.

Cumber's Caves, Little Cayman
Diving spot featuring coral grown into a massive buttress at the edge of the wall.

Randy's Gazebo, Little Cayman
Beautiful dive spot featuring tons of coral and sponges.

Great Wall, Little Cayman
Dive spot where the wall drops 90 degrees below.

Peter's Cave, Cayman Brac
One of Cayman Brac's top North Wall dive spots.

Smith Cove, Grand Cayman
Located on the southwest part of Grand Cayman, this is a good swimming and snokeling spot.

Pedro's Pinnacles, Grand Cayman
Trenches running seaward through the reef that are interconnected by short tunnels and swim-throughs.

West Gate, Grand Cayman
One of the many places off Grand Cayman to sight groupers, schooling Permit, Horse-eye Jacks, African Pompano and, occasionally, reef sharks or Hammerheads.

Julie's Wall, Grand Cayman
Dive spot on the East End of Grand Cayman.

Big Tunnels, Grand Cayman
Features a collection of tunnels, alleys and swim-throughs out to the wall, including a massive passage at 90 feet that is big enough to accommodate a medium-sized truck.

Sandchute, Grand Cayman
A large, white sand bottom canyon severing the edge of a cascading drop-off.

Big Dipper, Grand Cayman
Popular dive site where several species of fish can be photographed.

Japanese Gardens, Grand Cayman
Located off Grand Cayman's South Side, this site offers beautiful canyons of coral with archways and tunnels.

Eagle's Nest, Grand Cayman
Popular dive spot.

Northwest Point Drop-off, Grand Cayman
One of the best dive sites for turtles off Grand Cayman.

Rhapsody, Grand Cayman
One of Grand Cayman's great dive sites for turtles.

Tunnel of Love, Grand Cayman
One of the 50 dive sites to be found off Grand Cayman's East End.

Ghost Mountain, Grand Cayman
One of Grand Cayman's more unique wall sites in the north shore.

Sentinel Rock, Grand Cayman
Dive spot off Grand Cayman's West Side next to Big Tunnel featuring great topography.

Jack McKenney's Wall, Grand Cayman
Dive site featuring reefs, walls, coral formations, swim-through tunnels and canyon-like sand chutes.

The Gate, Grand Cayman
Site featuring a 20-foot diameter chute that starts at 70 feet and opens up on the wall at 100 feet.

Pat's Wall, Grand Cayman
A massive drop-off slotted with deep canyons, holes and giant outcroppings of coral running downward with big sponges on them.

Babylon, Grand Cayman
One of the 50 dive sites to be found off Grand Cayman's East End.

Hepps Wall, Grand Cayman
One of Grand Cayman's more unique wall sites in the north shore.

Gail's Mountain, Grand Cayman
A massive hill of coral rising 20 feet from the top of a wall to within 50 feet of the surface.

Andy's Wall, Grand Cayman
From the top at 55 to 60 feet on down, the wall is heavily punctuated with large coral buttresses.

Delila's Delight, Grand Cayman
Dive spot not typically bustling with large marine life, but the sheer scope of this wall is captivating.

Orange Canyon, Grand Cayman
A sheer, undercut cliff dropping several thousand feet into the indigo depths.

Balboa Wreck, Grand Cayman
Shipwreck favored by curious divers.

LCM David Nicholson Wreck, Grand Cayman
Notable West Side shore site.

Ridgefield Wreck, Grand Cayman
The WW II Liberty Ship was the victim of the East End's shallow barrier reef.

Bonnie's Arch, Grand Cayman
A must-see for visitors, this dive spot is easily reachable from shore and is full of color.

Aquarium, Grand Cayman
A favorite spot, known for its congregation of Tarpon and groupers.

Angelfish Reef, Grand Cayman
A favorite dive spot featuring friendly angelfish.

Sunset Reef, Grand Cayman
Popular for finding a variety of invertebrates and juvenile reef fish both day and night.

Black Forest, Grand Cayman
Famous dive spot off Grand Cayman.

Parrotfish Caverns, Grand Cayman
A giant coral grotto occupied by an estimated 50 supermale Parrotfish plus some 50 to 200 Tarpon.

Grouper Grotto, Grand Cayman
As the name would suggest, this is a great area to spot grouper, as well as other marine life.

Ironshore Gardens, Grand Cayman
A favorite spot for divers.

Point of Sand, Little Cayman
An uncrowded beach at the eastern tip of Little Cayman.

Lighthouse Wall, Little Cayman
Protected site on the tip of the south side of Bloody Bay Wall.

Fisheye Fantasy, Little Cayman
Features a prominent ridge running down the face of the wall, with three large holes through it at varying depths.

Marilyn's Cut, Little Cayman
Features stunning displays of sponge life, especially yellow tube and trumpet sponges, bright red rope and cup sponges.

Three Fathom Wall, Little Cayman
This sudden underwater drop-off is heralded by some as the best dive site on Little Cayman.

Lea's Lookout, Little Cayman
Dive site along Bloody Bay.

Soto Trader Wreck, Little Cayman
A 120-foot cargo freighter sitting upright on the bottom at a depth of 50 feet.

Mixing Bowl, Little Cayman
A dive site where Bloody Bay and Jackson Walls meet.

South Side, Little Cayman
One of the four regions of Grand Cayman for diving.

Great Wall West., Little Cayman

MV Captain Keith Tibbetts, Cayman Brac
A 330-foot Russian frigate that was sunk in September 1996.

Cemetery Wall, Cayman Brac
One of Cayman Brac's top North Wall dive spots.

Strawberry Sponge Wall, Cayman Brac
One of Cayman Brac's top North Wall dive spots.

Garden Eel Wall, Cayman Brac
One of Cayman Brac's top North Wall dive spots.

Piper's Wall, Cayman Brac
One of Cayman Brac's top North Wall dive spots.

Anchor Wall, Cayman Brac
A huge anchor that dates back to the 1600s sits tightly wedged in the middle of a crevice at 90 feet.

Eden Rocks, Cayman Brac
One of the best diving sites for novices.

Foster's Wall, Cayman Brac
A beautiful dive spot off Cayman Brac.

Pillars of Hercules, Cayman Brac
This shallow dive site includes several boulders which create an underwater maze.

Schoolhouse Wall, Cayman Brac
Short, sloping course to depths of 50 to 60 feet, where the reef terminates in a wall.

Elkhorn Forest, Cayman Brac
Named for the Elkhorn coral that inhabits it.

Cayman Mariner Wreck, Cayman Brac
A 55-foot crew boat lying upright on the sand at a depth of 60 feet.

Kissime Wreck, Cayman Brac
An inverted, 50-foot steel tugboat, this is a great shallow dive at 40 feet.

Snapper Reef, Cayman Brac
Popular dive site in the Cayman Islands offers an underwater wonderland of color and marine life.

 
©2017
Caribbean Travelweb



Grand Cayman